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Depending on what it is

Rwanda’s military intervention in Mozambique raises eyebrows

Rwandan forces have driven out Islamist militants in Mozambique’s gas-rich Cabo Delgado province. Their success underlines the failure of Mozambique’s army, but some observers want Rwanda to say when they will leave.

    

On August 9, the Rwandan military announced it had taken the strategically important northern Mozambican port of Mocimboa da Praia from al-Shabab militants. The Kigali daily New Times quoted Brigadier-General Pascal Muhizi as saying the Rwandan army had chased out the al-Shabab fighters.

The jihadis had occupied Mocimboa da Praia in the Cabo Delgado province for over a year but fled towards Tanzania on motorcycles. Others melted away into the thick forests south of Mocimboa, Muhizi added. Around 70 militants were killed, according to Rwandan army spokesperson Ronald Rwivanga.

Brig. Gen. Robert Allardice shows off a prototype of the Billy Mitchell heritage coat in the Pentagon on Monday, May 15, 2006. General Allardice is director of Airmen development and sustainment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. C. Todd Lopez)

Lt. Gen. Robert R. Allardice is Vice Commander, Air Mobility Command, Scott Air Force Base, Ill. The command is responsible for the bulk of the U.S. Air Force’s strategic transportation assets and mission. From 12 major air installations in the United States and nearly 100 active-duty, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve locations worldwide, AMC provides rapid, flexible, global reach for America. More than 141,500 people comprise the Total Force air mobility community, operating combat delivery and strategic airlift, air refueling, and aeromedical and special mission aircraft for national interests. 

General Allardice entered the Air Force in 1980 as a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering. His career includes command at 18th Air Force, the largest numbered air force, joint, wing, group and squadron levels. Additionally, he has served in a wide variety of high level operational and staff assignments at the Pentagon, Air Force Material Command, and Central Command. He deployed three times in support of operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. In 2001, he commanded the strategic humanitarian airdrop which began on the first night of combat operations in Afghanistan, the largest mass personnel airdrop since Operation Overlord, commonly referred to as D-Day. In the opening days of Operation Iraqi Freedom, he commanded and led the airdrop of the 173rd Airborne Brigade, seizing vital territory in northern Iraq. In 2007, he deployed to Iraq as Commander, Coalition Air Force Transition Team. There, he was responsible for the Multi-National Security Transition Command-Iraq for standing up the Iraqi air force. Prior to his current assignment, the general was the Commander, 18th Air Force, Scott AFB, Ill.

General Allardice is a command pilot with more than 5,000 hours in the C-141, C-5, C-17, KC-135 and C-21.

EDUCATION
1980 Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering, U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo.
1985 Squadron Officer School, Maxwell AFB, Ala.
1987 Master’s degree in systems management, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
1993 Air Command and Staff College, Maxwell AFB, Ala.
1998 Air War College, Maxwell AFB, Ala.
2003 Senior Executive Fellowship, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
2006 Program for Senior Managers in Government, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

ASSIGNMENTS
1. September 1980 – August 1981, student, undergraduate pilot training, Williams AFB, Ariz.
2. September 1981 – September 1986, instructor pilot and flight examiner, 86th Military Airlift Squadron, Travis AFB, Calif.
3. October 1986 – September 1987, Air Staff Training officer, Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans and Operations, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
4. October 1987 – August 1990, instructor pilot and flight examiner, 57th Military Airlift Squadron, Altus AFB, Okla.
5. September 1990 – July 1992, joint training and operations officer, Director of Operations, Headquarters U.S. European Command, Stuttgart-Vaihingen, Germany 6. August 1992 – June 1993, student, Air Command and Staff College, Maxwell AFB, Ala.
7. July 1993 – September 1993, student, Armed Forces Staff College, Norfolk, Va.
8. October 1993 – June 1997, Chief of Safety, 436th Airlift Wing, and Commander, 9th Airlift Squadron, Dover AFB, Del.
9. July 1997 – May 1998, student, Air War College, Maxwell AFB, Ala.
10. June 1998 – October 1998, Chief, War and Mobilization Plans Division, Directorate of Operations and Training, Deputy Chief of Staff for Air and Space Operations, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
11. October 1998 – May 2000, Chief, Expeditionary Air Force Implementation Division, Directorate of EAF Implementation, Deputy Chief of Staff for Air and Space Operations, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
12. May 2000 – June 2002, Commander, 437th Operations Group, Charleston AFB, S.C.
13. June 2002 – June 2004, Commander, 62nd Airlift Wing, McChord AFB, Wash.
14. June 2004 – October 2005, Director of Personnel, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 15. October 2005 – March 2007, Director of Airman Development and Sustainment, Deputy Chief of Staff for Manpower and Personnel, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
16. March 2007 – March 2008, Commander, Coalition Air Force Transition Team, Baghdad, Iraq 17. April 2008 – July 2009, Director, Strategy, Plans and Policy, Headquarters U.S. Central Command, MacDill AFB, Fla.
18. August 2009 – September 2011, Commander, 18th Air Force, Scott AFB, Ill.
19. September 2011 – present, Vice Commander, Air Mobility Command, Scott AFB, Ill.

SUMMARY OF JOINT ASSIGNMENTS
1. September 1990 – July 1992, joint training and operations officer, Director of Operations, Headquarters U.S. European Command, Stuttgart-Vaihingen, Germany, as a captain and major 2. March 2007 – March 2008, Commander, Coalition Air Force Transition Team, Baghdad, Iraq, as a brigadier general and major general 3. April 2008 – July 2009, Director, Strategy, Plans and Policy, Headquarters U.S. Central Command, MacDill AFB, Fla., as a major general

FLIGHT INFORMATION
Rating: Command pilot
Flight hours: More than 5,000
Aircraft flown: C-141, C-5, C-17, KC-135 and C-21

MAJOR AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal with oak leaf cluster
Defense Superior Service Medal
Legion of Merit with three oak leaf clusters Distinguished Flying Cross Bronze Star Medal

Lt. Gen. Robert Allardice, center right, Mrs. Susan Allardice, center left, and Chief Master Sgt. James Cody, left, receive a briefing on Raven tactics and procedures from Tech. Sgt. Tony Frese, right, on the flightline here Nov 30. General Allardice stopped at Charleston AFB for a two-day visit during his tour of the bases within his command. General Allardice is the 18th Air Force commander and Susan is his wife. Chief Cody is the 18th Air Force command chief. Sergeant Frese is assigned to the 437th Security Forces Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Marie Brown)

May her soul rest in perfect peace

Losing your wife and partner is a tragedy that will have devastating effects. To have to say goodbye to the woman you loved like no other will be heartbreaking, and such a loss carried with the grieving partner forever.
Bereavement is a long and painful process and so having family and friends to gather round and support you as you come to terms with a loss this great is essential.
When someone has lost a wife, perhaps a friend or relative of ours, we want to reach out and offer that person condolences. That can be in many ways; support, assistance, or just a message to let them know they’re in our thoughts.
But it can be difficult to put these thoughts and feelings into words. Knowing what to say to a friend who has lost a wife or how to phrase it is a daunting task.
Especially when it’s such a delicate situation and the bereaved is likely to be in a very fragile state. Words can be powerful so you want to make sure you say the right thing.
That’s why the selection of words of sympathy for loss of wife below will hopefully help you to find the ideal sympathy or condolence message that express how you feel. They can be used exactly as they are or changed so that they fit your situation.